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Black Cat Superstitions

1016305_10152703909425743_7973457700186399501_nIt's a little known fact that for most of my life, I actually considered myself to be more of a cat person than a dog person.  So you're probably wondering where all the cat posts are right?  Or why, since starting my blog back in 2010, I've never talked about owning a cat?  The simple, but unfortunate, answer is that my fiance is allergic to cats.  That, coupled with the fact that I also own small animals that might be seen as prey to a cat, probably means that we'll always be cat free.  But that doesn't mean that I can't admire them from afar!  I've always especially admired black cats, despite the fact that some superstitions label them as bad luck.

Having bad luck is never fun, but sadly it's the black cats themselves who suffer the most from this superstition.  Did you know that many shelters/rescues report that they have a harder time finding homes for black cats than for cats of any other color?  Cat owners who have had the pleasure of having one of these black beauties grace their home know that black cats make just as amazing pets as any other color of cat!

 

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How did these adorable cats originally get labeled as bad luck anyways?  The myth that black cats cause bad luck is a relatively recent superstition.  It can be traced back to the middle ages, when black cats were believed to be associated with the devil and witch craft.  Cats, black ones in particular, were thought to be popular familiars to witches.  It was believed by some that witches had the power to transform into black cats, and that they used this disguise to wreck havoc on the locals.

But not all cultures believe that black cats bring bad luck.  In fact, a Scottish superstition says that black cats signify prosperity.  Black cats are also considered to be good luck in Japan, where it is believed that black cats help single women find suitors.  In Great Britain, black cats are thought to bring about good luck.

The lower adoption rates of black cats might be caused not only by the history of superstition that surrounds them, but also because solid colored animals are sometimes though of as plain or boring, and are passed up in favor of more colorful or uniquely marked animals.  Some shelter workers have stated that black or dark furred animals are hard to take good photos of, making it less likely that perspective owners browsing internet adoption sites will fall in love with photos of the animals and inquire about adopting them.

Whatever the reasons, the truth of the matter is that black cats make just as good pets as any other cat would.  Next time you’re in the market for a new pet, don’t pass the black cats by.  They often times get overlooked, but bring one of them into your home and you will not only be saving a life, you will be making a new lifelong friend - one that, who knows, might even bring you a bit of good luck!

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