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Last month when I posted our September monthly favorites post I mentioned that I had purchased some catnip.  I, sadly, didn't get any cats to go with it.  While I personally quite enjoy the company of cats there won't be any joining the Paw Pack anytime soon - my fiance is allergic to them.  So why is someone without any cats buying catnip?  Because it's safe for dogs too! ...continue reading "Catnip…for Dogs!"

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I said it already but I'll say it again - my poor, beloved Kitsune is having a bit of a rough summer.  Luckily we seem to have gotten a handle on his seasonal allergies, they were worse this year than I think they've ever been before.  In late July he somehow managed to break his tail, which is why he's been sporting much shorter tail hair than what everyone is used to seeing.  Last week I took him to the beach and we had an awesome time together, but what I didn't share when I posted about our trip was that poor Kit got bitten by a snake! ...continue reading "What To Do If Your Dog Is Bitten By A Snake"

Last weekend the dogs and I went hiking.  Awhile after we got home I was cleaning up the house a bit and found a foxtail on the bedroom floor.  I figured either the dogs or I must have brought it home from our hike, perhaps it was stuck onto my clothing or the dogs' fur.  After finding that one on the floor I promptly checked over both the dogs to make sure they didn't bring any other hitchhikers home.

For most people, the word "foxtail" doesn't conjure up images of horror.  But ask any unfortunate pet owner whose pet has had a run in with these pesky plants, and you'll most likely hear at least a few horror stories.  They may look innocent enough, but foxtails can present some very real dangers to pets. ...continue reading "Protect Your Pets From Foxtails"

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Warning:  This post contains images of Kitsune's hot spots.  If images of dog wounds/blood bother you you should skip this post.

Anyone who's been a Paw Print reader for any length of time, especially recently, probably already knows that I'm not a huge fan of the hot weather.  Personally I'd rather be cold than hot, and my pets, for the most part, seem to tolerate the colder weather better than the heat as well.  While I've written recently about how we're not crazy about the heat, I don't think I've ever written in depth about the true bane of our summers - Kitsune's summer time itchies and his resulting hot spots. ...continue reading "Kitsune’s Summer Time Itchies (Dealing with Allergies and Hot Spots in Dogs)"

Spring is in the air!  For lots of people, the warming weather means they can get back to gardening.  Whether you have a massive garden and a green thumb, or just have a tiny bit of turf to tend, pet owners know that some plants can present health risks to our furry family members.  Seemingly unrelated, almost all pet owners also know all about the danger of chocolate.  Why am I talking about chocolate in a post that started off being about gardening?  Because of cocoa mulch, that's why!  Don't let your pet become a victim of the mulchacre (get it - mulch massacre?)!  The dangers that cocoa mulch can present to pets is no laughing matter. ...continue reading "The Dangers Of Cocoa Mulch"

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I've mentioned at least a few times now that, since the weather here has been getting nicer, I've been spending a lot more time playing with the boys at the park.  One day in particular last week I walked Kit to the beach, via a path that was bordered by lots of fresh green grass, and all Kit wanted to do was graze!  ...continue reading "Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?"

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Back in February I posted a video of my rabbit, Barnaby, begging for then eating his morning 'cookie'.  I had planned on eventually writing a bit more about why I started this ritual with Barnaby.  Here's a hint, it's not just because Barnaby loves cookies!  ...continue reading "The Rabbit Treat Test"

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Most veterinarians will recommend, to reduce the chances of your pet becoming sick from parasite borne diseases, that pet owners use flea and tick preventatives on their pets. Usually this means using a monthly topical flea/tick preventative. These topical treatments are usually applied to the pets' skin at the back of the neck or between the shoulder blades. Once applied, the animals' oil glands soak up the medication and spread it all over the surface of the pets skin. When a flea or tick goes to bite your pet, they are exposed to the preventative on the pets skin and usually killed or repelled. ...continue reading "Alternatives to Traditional Chemical Flea and Tick Prevention"

Millions of homeless pets are euthanized in animal shelters each year. One sure way to make sure that your beloved pets do not contribute to this tragic number is to get them spayed or neutered. However, depending on where you live and what type of pet you have the surgery to have your pet fixed can be quite expensive.  Luckily, there are a number of different programs that offer lower cost spaying or neutering services. ...continue reading "Low Cost Spay and Neuter Programs"

Obesity is a growing epidemic for pets. Even some well meaning owners allow their pets to become overweight. It can be hard to refuse giving your pet extra treats, and with today's hectic schedules it can sometimes be hard to give our pets the exercise they need. ...continue reading "How to Calculate Your Pets Caloric Needs"

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